Tom V. (tiotditv) wrote,
Tom V.
tiotditv

The Identity of Cyclists as a Counter-Culture to Economic Rationalism I

As a part of the anti-globalisation movement, cycling has inspiring a lot of people to once again leave their cars behind and pedal to wherever it may be that they need to go. But as a result, those who have chosen not to give up their motor vehicle have thus an almost hatred of those who generate their own power of transportation. And I think this is a relationship that can be linked to capitalism or economic rationalism in general. And its really not that complex.

Cyclists, as I just said, generate their own power, from their own strength, from their own muscles in order to both 1, move themselves forward in both a symbolic and wealth way and 2, use their own personal means of production (to use Marxist terms) to do better for society as a whole. Cycling inspires someone to use their own strength to recognise their worth as a single being as part of a whole society.

Cars do the opposite. Although you are inspired to still move yourself forward, you are essentially made to do so through economic rationalised means. You have to spend significant amounts of money on a car, maintaining a car, refueling it regulary, etc. So in other words, although you could be told you are doing good for ones society by spending (oxymoron?), you are really only building up the economy.

Cars lie at the heart of economic rationalism, they inspire personal movement through avenues (pun intended) of social economic spending.

And bikes do just the opposite of that. They feed the heart of capitalism, in part even making car-culture the counter-culture of cycling. Cycling conveys social responsibility through its own avenues.

To be continued

P.S.: And just a thought for cyclists in Perth - if roads were built like cycleways, no one would be driving a car. Think about it.
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